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The bike is a Emotion Easy, Neo City. It is a good sturdy bike. The owner lived in West Malvern and it handled all of Malvern's hills well. The bike has a new console fitted and two battery chargers are included. But the bike itself needs some work, the wheel rims have gone, so it needs new wheels and a new chain. The battery has about half it's life left, so hopefully there's another year or two life in it yet. The bike is being offered on the basis of 'spares or repairs'.

If you are interested please fill in your email below and we will pass it on to the owner.

Our Malvern Hills Car Clubs celebrated its 10th Anniversary recently and issued the following press release.

Press Release, for immediate publication

Malvern Hills Car Clubs is a community-based car sharing scheme, and last week, on 1st April, it held its tenth AGM.  The original plan had been to hold this at the Cube, and to combine it with a birthday party, with members bringing food to share.  Given current circumstances, the meeting was held virtually using Zoom (an online conference facility).

The birthday party atmosphere was maintained by some members arriving with gin and tonic and crisps, or cups of tea and biscuits, and the celebration started with everybody present sharing something that they appreciated about the car club.  One member who has recently returned to the Malvern area after several years of living abroad was grateful that she has not had to buy a car since she came back.  A member who lives in the northeast and works in Ledbury is very happy that he did not need to buy a second car for the time that he spends here.  One couple were pleased that they have not needed to own a car for ten years - since the car club started.  Another member expressed gratitude for the fact that there are fewer cars on the roads, and fewer cars parked on the streets. Several people also mentioned the commitment and devotion of the volunteers who run the club, and the sense of community and connection that being a member of the club creates.

With this being an AGM, the accounts were presented, revealing a small surplus and a healthy bank balance.  However, the car club is not immune to the Coronavirus.  On the contrary, the impact has been immediate.  Members are responding to the lockdown advice and only using the cars for the permitted outings with the result that usage for March was a mere 10% of normal. 

In the short term, the car club’s finances will enable the club to ride out the immediate drop in usage.  The conversation about contingency plans to help the situation was followed by thoughts about the opportunities for the future.  Two different opportunities were discussed, the first related to the Covid-19 effect, and the second to possible expansion plans.

First, with almost everyone moving around less at the moment, some people may decide that they can continue to drive less, and therefore that they do not need to own their own car.  The car club is a very good solution for people who only use a car two or three times a week in normal times.  Similarly, households with two cars may decide that they can manage with owning only one, and use a car club car as a substitute for the second.  There are already many car club members in this situation.

The second opportunity is the potential for partnerships with local villages.  The parish councils of six villages in the area - three in Worcestershire, and three in Herefordshire - have recently declared a climate emergency, and are looking at actions that they can take locally to address this.  They are exploring arrangements with Malvern Hills Car Clubs as one possibility - one which would not only help with climate change, but would also support people living in rural locations for whom transport options are limited.

Notes for Editors

Malvern Hills Car Clubs was founded in 2010.  It is one of the initiatives to come from Transition Malvern Hills.

The club is run entirely by volunteers, which keeps costs to a minimum.

The club covers Malvern, Colwall and Ledbury.  140 households are members, and the club has seventeen vehicles, including one electric car and a pick-up truck.

Website: https://malvernhills-carclubs.org.uk/

We are giving a talk on The Centre for Alternative Technology(CAT) new Zero Carbon Report. This will be at 30th March at 8pm.

Due to the Virus Emergency this talk will now be online.

Zoom will be used for this talk. The Zoom link is https://zoom.us/j/544847254 .

For details of how to use Zoom see here.

The slides are available here.

For the full report and lost more information and resources see CAT's own website.

The Centre for Alternative Technology(CAT) has release a new Zero Carbon Report. This major 200 page report shows how Britain become carbon neutral. A modern, zero-emissions society is possible using technology available today.

For the full report and lost more information and resources see CAT's own website.

I would urge all of you to read this report.

40% of UK carbon emissions come from households. Get active - 10 things you can do now that will make a difference.

  • Make sure lights are switched off and doors are closed in rooms that are not being used.
  • Put on an extra jumper and turn your heating thermostat down by 2 degrees.
  • Have a ‘no car day’ once a week.
  • Talk about climate change with family, friends and work colleagues.  Share your thoughts and ideas.
  • Create a wildlife friendly garden, encourage bees, birds and other wildlife. Don’t use pesticides or herbicides, look for eco friendly alternatives.
  • Support local wildlife trusts/groups.
  • Think twice before buying clothes or goods - do you really need them?  Malvern Repair Cafe can repair most things for a donation. 
  • Reduce, reuse and recycle everything where possible.  Request non plastic packaging on your online purchases. Malvern and Worcester have a shop to refill your household cleaners, soaps and dried foods, bring your own containers.
  • Buy local foods wherever possible. We are lucky to have Greenlink in Great Malvern and Natural Choice in Barnards Green that sell local produce. Cut down on your meat eating.
  • Be positive, you can make a difference.

The electric bike loan scheme is hoping to expand to Ledbury.

Our appeal for funds to have an Electric Bike in Ledbury has been successful in being part of the Ledbury Tesco plastic bag Community Fund. So all tokens deposited in the Ledbury store in May and June will contribute and depending where we are placed amongst the 3 contenders will determine the amount we get. If you are in Ledbury please add your tokens if you shop at Tesco.

This article is from notes taken by Dinah Sage at the talk given to Rail and Bus for Herefordshire on 23 November 2016 by Professor John Whitelegg of the Stockholm Environment Institute.

Image by Laurent Mercat, Vélivert Intermodalité STAS, CC BY-SA 3.0

Professor Whitelegg has worked with community groups worldwide, saving pedal rickshaws in Calcutta, working with groups in Britain, saving the Settle -Carlisle Railway. He believes that railways should be accountable with a public service remit.

He is questioning why Deutsche Bahn’s excellent service and use of renewable energy has not be transferred to its subsidiary Arriva Wales. He is hoping his letter will be published in the German newspapers.

Good things

Freiburg - a German city similar to Hereford - has totally turned its transport system around in the last forty years. Only a quarter of journeys are by car. The transport system is integrated, with high quality bus, train and bike routes. When a large housing estate was planned, it was designed to be car-free, and the tramline to the city was put in first. Denmark, Sweden and the Netherlands have similar systems. There is not one in Britain.

In Switzerland hourly buses connect Basle railway station to small towns and villages.

Tourists staying in the Black Forest are given a free transport pass. It gives a psychological boost to using public transport. The area has similarities to Shrewsbury to Hereford, and is booming.

Why is transport so bad in the UK?

The problem lies deeper than the integration of buses and trains

Decision makers on transport do not relate the problems to bigger issues.

Our transport system is regressive - it seems designed to take from the poor and give to the rich.

Highspeed rail, airports and roads do not address the problems faced by old people, those on limited incomes or children.

The funds allocated for an M4 relief road round Cardiff, supposedly to ease congestion and boost economic growth, could be used to create a South Wales Metro on the German model.

The connection between transport and social exclusion was examined in a Cabinet Office report in 2003. But the political system rejects evidence. The Implications for health and climate change are ignored.

Good public transport maximises economic activity.

If you want a city to be cheaper to run - have good public transport. High car use is very expensive. The International Organisation for Public Transport shows that a public transport system can be cheaper.

Opinion surveys are generally ignored by politicians. When asked if they would prefer more road and no buses, most people would say no.

The possibility that the social costs of looking after old people and children could be lower, and the population could be healthier are ignored.

Bad News

Climate change is worsening. According to the Stockholm Environment Institute, homes and manufacturing are becoming more efficient, but transport is out of control.

Public Health officials do not understand the impact of transport on health - contributing to obesity, cancer and lung disease.

There is no mention of an air quality action plan on the Herefordshire county website - even though it is a legal requirement. Particle emissions are not monitored.

The air quality in Hereford falls below acceptable levels. Councillors know this, but the leaders decided to build more roads - making the problem worse.

Road congestion near Hereford Cathedral is bad for road safety, and health - but so far no-one has been killed, so no attention is paid.

What do we do?

If there is a consultation or survey, or at the school gate, talk, argue, lobby to show that the situation can be improved.

The idea of change is thought ridiculous but ridiculous debates have happened before. Providing access to clean water and sewers for all was once considered too expensive. The society for the Protection of Slavery made a case for slavery being necessary to the economy.

We are really backward. 100,000 vehicle in London contribute to 9000 deaths a year.

  • Need to argue convincingly that this is wrong
  • Public health implications are appalling
  • Fiscal accountability would provide a different way of assessing transport costs
  • Cities become cheaper to run.
  • Helps to mitigate climate change
  • Transport needs to be seen in a wider context.

Can we raise the level of discussion?

  • Convince government to ensure fiscal policy aids investment in better transport systems.
    • This would help the environment
    • And mitigate climate change
  • Join forces, eg groups campaigning for speed reduction join groups trying to improve bus services, railways, provision for cyclists and walkers. As in Sweden’s’ Living Streets and Vision Zero (no more road deaths).
  • Use facts and figures - see CAT’s (Centre for Alternative Technology) Zero Carbon Britain and the Stockholm Environment Institute’s Vision Zero.

Good News

There are numerous examples of chipping away at negativity such as Energiewende in Germany. Deutsche Bahn has joined in - all its trains will run on renewable energy (except Arriva).

There are many groups in Europe arguing for the transformation of transport.

The New York transport commissioner has made several squares car-free.

Local groups with an interest in transport are working hard - campaigns for buses, railway groups, those interested in roads, cycling and accessibility of services.